Learning to pipe

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And you can do it too!

It’s another day, sun is out, birds are chirping.  So what’s a girl to do, but bake cupcakes.

I was invited to a party and wanted to offer something different then what I usually do.  Sure, there were other cupcakes there, but I’m proud to say they didn’t look as good as mine.  And I DON’T mean that in an evil, negative way.  Just an observation that presentation really is key.  This I always new, but to see it once again was a great reminder – hence wanting to learn how to pipe.  AND NO, all of mine were not superb, but the effort was well received and I appreciated that.

So I jump in the bakemobil and headed out to a few shops to gather some supplies.  After doing some research I learned the tips I wanted were 1M, 2A and 2D of which are pictured below.   I tossed them in the cart – ‘ting’, the tips bounced against the bar.

“That’s her!” a woman whispers in the aisle.

“Is she looking at cupcake supplies?” another voice quietly observes.

I figured I needed some bags, but came across a link mentioning using zip locks. “Now may not be the time to explore,” I mumbled to myself. Figured I needed to learn the correct methods before making stuff up.

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Dessert in Israel

Allow me to first take this time to thank you all for liking my post, following along, leaving comments or simply browsing while passing through.  Note I have also visited you alls pages and am impressed with your stories, creativity, recipes and knowledge. xoxo

The Fisherman’s Restaurant at Old Jaffa Port.  I’ll keep this short and sweet 🙂

Malabi, a creamy, popular Middle Eastern milk-based pudding.   However, an Arab dessert, it has become a staple in Israel.  Usually sweetened with rosewater, Malabi can be served with varied toppings such as nuts, pomegranate seeds or pistachios .  Mine was served with strawberry sauce, coconut shaving and nuts.  Also known as Muhallabieh, you can find this sweet treat as a street food item or upscale establishment.

Fun fact I’ve learned is that the recipe originally comes form Turkey and is an offering to Turkish Jewish weddings, symbolizing a ‘sweet’ journey ahead.  How sweet!

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The restaurant itself was simple – nice.  It sits along the water offering indoor and outdoor dinning options with some eye catching and eye sore views.  We were a large party who easily took up 3 – 4 tables.  Service was pleasant, food was decent or good for those who have a huge appreciation for bread and hummus (basically Mediterranean food, but I’m not those people) yet clearly the dessert was something special.  Not completely sure, but for those who care it may be the only kosher restaurant in Jaffa Port.

Getting back to the dessert, unfortunately, the coconut shavings interfered with my over enjoyment of this dessert, I’m not a fan of coconut, but my respect for the dish still remains.  Our host covered the meal so I am unable to offer cost, but when you go, go with a huge appetite!

Amenities (parking, location, seating, menu selections, etc) **
Customer Service (greeted, helpful, polite, checking-in, etc) ***
Cleanliness ***
Experience (themed, music, atmosphere, energy, etc) ***
Taste *
Price 

Happy Resurrection Sunday for those who celebrate!

I made cinnamon rolls :)

Guys I am so excited because I made cinnamon rolls today – YES!  Are they the best you’ve ever seen?  Probably not LOL but that’s ok.  I’m still proud of my efforts 🙂

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I wasn’t sure whose recipes to explore.  I’m also those people who for whatever stubborn reason lacks the interest of following instructions and enjoys breaking away to do my own thing – don’t ask why (…probably why you didn’t love it). Also, The Eagle doesn’t really care for cream cheese so I changed the glaze as well.

I was nervous the entire time.  Whenever I’m near bread/yeast, things go wrong LOL  If you read the previous blog about biscuits then you should remember me mentioning I tend to over kneed or simply destroy the dough.  OH – FYI, I’m going to practice biscuits sometime this week. Not only should you wish me luck, BUT also send out a bread prayer – just saying and thanks in advance!IMG_3104.JPG

I’m not posting the recipe either.  Not because I don’t want to share, but because I’m still working on it for it’s a mixture of a few.  Besides, it’s not 3 or 4 stars yet. The bread came out well, but I could have pulled it out of the oven few minuets sooner. It baked for 25-30 minuets at 350 degrees.  I should have taken it out the first time I checked on them 20-25 minuets in.  Luckily they were still soft.

For the icing I combined powered sugar, butter and VERY little cream cheese.  He actually enjoyed it – Shocking!

IMG_3106.JPG Over all, we were pleased.  They were yummy enough.  I ate two back to back and a third an hour later.  I was VERY proud of myself, but I know what’s great and I have ways to go, but that’s ok because I’m down for the ride. <eye wink>

Well, I just wanted to share.  And if there’s something you too are working on, you have my support 🙂

YOU CAN DO IT!

Celebrating Black History Month…with the pastry fork

On March 1, 1892 the special version of the pastry fork was patented by Ms. Anna M. Mangin.  Designed to cut together butter and flour to create pie crusts and cookies, the pastry fork was a tool to use without involving your hands to physically manipulate the ingredients.  The utensil could also be used to beat eggs and mash other food items.

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Looks like an open slotted spatula huh?  It was be made of iron, steel, wood or any other suitable material.  The pastry fork allowed the ingredients to mix and pass through freely and was also designed to thoroughly cut and pulverize the dry pastry.

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Luckily with the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, African-Americans could finally receive patents on their inventions.  So many never gained recognition for their achievements prior.  Some never wanted to be identified, believing their nationality or sex would hinder the rise and success of their inventions.

Well, I am proud of my ancestors and their inventions, patented or not, named or unnamed.  There are so many tools we use today because of them and I am forever baking-liciously thankful 🙂

Celebrating Black History Month…with the biscuit cutter

OMG anyone who knows me knows to never eat my biscuits.  <sigh>  YES, meaning they are that horrible. I just can’t get it.  I suck at it AND I TRY SO HARD (pathetic sad face).  Oh as I lay on the floor in a big X surrounded by a variety of flours, I think to myself…why me?  Well, a few biscuits turned cookies or whatever they may be is not going to stop me from figuring it out (confident smile, yet still secretly crying on the inside).

Circling through a few readings, I decided to write about one of my many loves…biscuits!

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Noticed I said cookies.  Now in some regions outside of the US and Canada, crisp biscuits are considered cookies.  So like I said, unfortunately I’m skilled at constructing a tray of ‘cookies’ LOL Now, there are many types of biscuits. There are angel biscuits (these contain yeast), drop biscuits, rolled biscuits, short cakes, cookies and scones…of which I don’t believe in.

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