Learning to pipe

LOOK WHAT I DID!!!IMG_3005.JPG

And you can do it too!

It’s another day, sun is out, birds are chirping.  So what’s a girl to do, but bake cupcakes.

I was invited to a party and wanted to offer something different then what I usually do.  Sure, there were other cupcakes there, but I’m proud to say they didn’t look as good as mine.  And I DON’T mean that in an evil, negative way.  Just an observation that presentation really is key.  This I always new, but to see it once again was a great reminder – hence wanting to learn how to pipe.  AND NO, all of mine were not superb, but the effort was well received and I appreciated that.

So I jump in the bakemobil and headed out to a few shops to gather some supplies.  After doing some research I learned the tips I wanted were 1M, 2A and 2D of which are pictured below.   I tossed them in the cart – ‘ting’, the tips bounced against the bar.

“That’s her!” a woman whispers in the aisle.

“Is she looking at cupcake supplies?” another voice quietly observes.

I figured I needed some bags, but came across a link mentioning using zip locks. “Now may not be the time to explore,” I mumbled to myself. Figured I needed to learn the correct methods before making stuff up.

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Pineapples & Pancakes

(Facebook repost)

Alright, I have another one for ya!  The Eagle and I (the boyfriend) took a trip to try out this Pineapple Upside-Down Pancake.   These trips aren’t always planned, for sometimes the people call upon us.  Who are these people?  You know, the people.  The people reach out to us when in need of deciding where to eat.  It’s what we do…and I enjoy it.

We pull up, seems the lot knew we were in the neighborhood – parking was easy.  The Eagle steps out to adjust his sun-glasses.  “BEEP” the car locks.  “Head towards the green awning”, I yell out.  We worked our way to the door, confirming its entrance.

It’s bright and pleasant inside, I smile with approval.  The waitress guides us to our seat, seconds for waiting.  I suddenly hear chatter, “I think it’s her?”  I knew what they’re thinking.  The sounds take me back to Jacks n Joe‘s.

I place the order – DISHES CRASH!!!

“She ordered it,” a young girl whispers.

“You think she’ll like it?” another questions.

The Eagle wasn’t so sure so we opted to share yet ordered potatoes and eggs with a biscuit on the side.

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Dessert in Israel

Allow me to first take this time to thank you all for liking my post, following along, leaving comments or simply browsing while passing through.  Note I have also visited you alls pages and am impressed with your stories, creativity, recipes and knowledge. xoxo

The Fisherman’s Restaurant at Old Jaffa Port.  I’ll keep this short and sweet 🙂

Malabi, a creamy, popular Middle Eastern milk-based pudding.   However, an Arab dessert, it has become a staple in Israel.  Usually sweetened with rosewater, Malabi can be served with varied toppings such as nuts, pomegranate seeds or pistachios .  Mine was served with strawberry sauce, coconut shaving and nuts.  Also known as Muhallabieh, you can find this sweet treat as a street food item or upscale establishment.

Fun fact I’ve learned is that the recipe originally comes form Turkey and is an offering to Turkish Jewish weddings, symbolizing a ‘sweet’ journey ahead.  How sweet!

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The restaurant itself was simple – nice.  It sits along the water offering indoor and outdoor dinning options with some eye catching and eye sore views.  We were a large party who easily took up 3 – 4 tables.  Service was pleasant, food was decent or good for those who have a huge appreciation for bread and hummus (basically Mediterranean food, but I’m not those people) yet clearly the dessert was something special.  Not completely sure, but for those who care it may be the only kosher restaurant in Jaffa Port.

Getting back to the dessert, unfortunately, the coconut shavings interfered with my over enjoyment of this dessert, I’m not a fan of coconut, but my respect for the dish still remains.  Our host covered the meal so I am unable to offer cost, but when you go, go with a huge appetite!

Amenities (parking, location, seating, menu selections, etc) **
Customer Service (greeted, helpful, polite, checking-in, etc) ***
Cleanliness ***
Experience (themed, music, atmosphere, energy, etc) ***
Taste *
Price 

Happy Resurrection Sunday for those who celebrate!

Celebrating Black History Month…with ice cream

kens.jpg(photo credit: Ken’s Ice Cream Parlor)

African-American Augustus Jackson, known as, “The Father of Ice cream” did not invent ice cream, but enhanced methods of manufacturing ice cream around 1832.

Born April 16, 1808, African-American Augustus Jackson started working as a servant in the White House at the age of 12.  He worked his way up the ranks to soon become one of the top chefs.   After moving back to Philadelphia, the former White House Chef became a  candy confectioner and started a prosperous catering business.  Along with making candy, Augustus also created multiple flavors of ice cream distributing them to other venders/parlors throughout the city, but unfortunately never patented any of his work.  However, Pittsburgh resident, Alfred Cralle did have his invention patented in 1897, which happened to be the ice cream mold.  What’s my connection of interest?  I too am a native of Pennsylvania  🙂

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Celebrating Black History Month…with sweet potato pie

For Black History Month I wasn’t sure what I should do.  After going back and forth with different ideas I finally decided for the third time lol to create a short list of popular desserts hosted by Blacks/African-Americans.  Today I shall start off with pie.

Food has always been utilized for celebrations or simply an opportunity to gather with loved ones.  Soul Food, the term originating from the 60’s, known as the African-American Southern Cuisine has been an important staple of our culture.  Combining ingredients, recipes and experiences passed down from our African elders, Native Americans and even Europeans is what makes it interesting and dear to our hearts.

With recipes dating back to Medieval Europe, the Sweet Potato Pie is a traditional open face pie usually prepared by boiling the potatoes until soft and skinning them for mashing.  The pie filing is usually a combination of the mashed potatoes, sugar, milk and eggs, however varied regions include spices, flavoring or additions such as vanilla and cinnamon.

Today Blacks/African-Americans are mainly familiar with sweet potato pies.  It’s the staple of most African-American homes. However, Africans were more familiar with yams since yams were native to Africa.    Around the 16th century, Europeans brought over the practice of preparing pumpkin pies as a main dessert to West Africans as well as sweet potatoes.   However, during the times of slavery, Africans abandoned the use of pumpkin and leaned towards the use of yams and of course eventually transitioned into sweet potatoes.

th.jpeg (photo credit: metrocuisine.net)

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