Celebrating Black History Month – Los Angeles Black Businesses (Dinner Guide)

I Know, I know It’s Dinner!  

TOTALLY against my food rules, BUT…just this once.

Offering an updated 2018 guide to (B.O.) restaurants throughout Los Angeles, CA.

(Upscale)

Pips on La Brea
1356 S. La Brea Ave., Los Angeles
323-954-7477

Post and Beam
3767 Santa Rosalia Dr., Los Angeles
323-299-5599

Hal’s Bar & Grill
1349 Abbott Kinney, Los Angeles
310-396-3105

Xen Lounge
10628 Ventura Blvd., Studio City
818-505-3513

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Celebrating Black History with Grandma & Lemon Meringue Pies

I’m celebrating Black History with my grandmother, Helen and Lemon Meringue Pies!

My grandmother was known for her Lemon Meringue and Sweet Potato Pies.  Pies, to this day my mother pretends to properly make LOL.  ‘Black History’ doesn’t have to be about a subject or person you never met, but could be a relative or even yourself!  So, how I wish to take time today to reflect and offer gratitude is to focus on Lemon Meringue Pies because they make me think of my grandmother and SHE is my history!

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RECIPE:

Grandma’s Lemon Meringue Pie 

1 cup sugar
2 tablespoons flour
3 tablespoon conrstarch
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups water
2 lemons, juiced and zested
2 tablespoons butter
4 egg yolks, beaten
1 (9 inch) pie crust, baked
4 egg whites
6 tablespoons sugar

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  • In a medium saucepan, mix together sugar, flour, cornstarch and salt.
  • Next stir in water, lemon juice and lemon zest while cooking over medium-high heat until mixture comes to a boil then add butter.
  • Whisk egg yolks in bowl, then add half of the hot mixture into the yolks. Slowly combine then add entire yolk mixture back into the original hot mixture in sauce pan to bring to a boil, continuing stirring until thick.
  • Once thickened, remove from heat and pour into baked pie crust, allow to set/form
  • For the meringue, in a bowl, whip egg whites until foamy.
  • Gradually add a little sugar as needed and continue to whip until stiff peaks form.
  • Spread meringue over cooled pie
  • Bake pie in oven for 10 minuets or until meringue is slightly brown/golden on top.

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Celebrating Black History Month – Los Angeles Black Businesses (Breakfast Guide)

Offering an updated 2018 guide to (B.O.) Breakfast & Brunch spots throughout Los Angeles, CA.

Adassa’s Breakfast Cafe
4305 Degnan Blvd
 – Ste 103
Los Angeles, CA 90008

Cafe Buna
3105 Washington Blvd., Marina del Rey
310-823-2430

Denny’s
3740 S. Crenshaw Blvd,
Los Angeles, CA 90016
323-298-5498

Flavor Table, The
2812 W. Florence Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90043
323-751-6000

Jack’s Family Kitchen
3965 S Western Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90062
323-296-5215

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Celebrating Black History Month – Los Angeles Black Owned Businesses (Dessert Guide)

Offering an updated 2018 guide to (B.O.) Bakeries throughout Los Angeles, CA.

27th Street Bakery
2700 South Central Ave.
Los Angeles, CA. 90011
323-233-3469

Big Man Bakes
413 S. Main St. @4th
Los Angeles, CA 90013
213-617-9100

Bonnie B Bakery
6344 Topanga canyon Blvd., Suite 1030
Woodland Hills, California
747-226-3497

Cobblers Cakes & Kream
2323 W Manchester Blvd.
Inglewood, CA 90305
323-455-1224

Cobbler Lady
3854 Crenshaw Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90008
323-298-2144

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Celebrating Black History Month…with the pastry fork

On March 1, 1892 the special version of the pastry fork was patented by Ms. Anna M. Mangin.  Designed to cut together butter and flour to create pie crusts and cookies, the pastry fork was a tool to use without involving your hands to physically manipulate the ingredients.  The utensil could also be used to beat eggs and mash other food items.

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Looks like an open slotted spatula huh?  It was be made of iron, steel, wood or any other suitable material.  The pastry fork allowed the ingredients to mix and pass through freely and was also designed to thoroughly cut and pulverize the dry pastry.

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Luckily with the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, African-Americans could finally receive patents on their inventions.  So many never gained recognition for their achievements prior.  Some never wanted to be identified, believing their nationality or sex would hinder the rise and success of their inventions.

Well, I am proud of my ancestors and their inventions, patented or not, named or unnamed.  There are so many tools we use today because of them and I am forever baking-liciously thankful 🙂